Where Do We Go Now?

I started this blog in 2011 and as you do at this time of year, I’ve been looking back through the postings to see what I seem to be writing about. The blog is meant to be about property litigation, and to no real surprise I have written quite a lot about that. However, I do keep coming back to a different topic, and this is another piece of that sort.

The topic is the actual way in which people can use their legal rights and the legal system that supports them.

As a practical lawyer I know that for people to have useful legal rights they need a lot more than just having the rights themselves. They need to know about them, be able to get advice, and have practical, and affordable ways of enforcing them.  I have written about the need for all businesses to know some basic law in Law and Business and about some of the other requirements for a practical legal system in Having Rights is Not Enough, and pointed out why Mediation is not the answer,  but this time I want to look at things from another angle. I touched on it in Tell Me what You Want, but I’ve developed it further here.

A lot has been made of the changes in legal procedure and practice over recent years. Some people say that it is a long-needed simplification, and the cutting of miles of unnecessary red tape, that will result in much quicker, easier and cheaper justice for all. Others say that it is the destruction of hundreds of years of justice and a legal profession solely for the advantage of big business, the government and other prowerful players in the field. The argument has raised a lot of heat, but not cast a lot of light, and I’m not going to tackle things in such a broad brush way. Because there was something to be said for both sides.

The practical effect however has changed the legal landscape, and like the earth after the asteroid, it is no longer a place for dinosaurs. This piece is aimed at lawyers who want to survive.

The Sheep, Goats and Dinosaurs

In the new reality you can divide the survivors into two sorts: the sheep and the goats.

The Sheep are major companies, the Government and its quangos, and High Net Worth Individuals, engaged in disputes with other Sheep, and the large firms of lawyers they use, based in the major cities.They deal with the High Court, and the Court of Appeal, and apart from some increase in cost, and some decrease in the time taken by the Courts to deal with things, they will have noticed very little change.

The Goats are smaller businesses, clubs and associations, and the rest of the population. They have disputes with other Goats, and also from time to time with Sheep. They also use Goats –  smaller specialised lawyers and other agencies who adapt rapidly to change. They generally deal the County Court and District Registries, and have noticed very significant increases in cost and in the time taken to deal with their cases, and a large reduction in the resourses available for their use. So they have to be canny and resourceful and will be the heroes of this article.

The Dinosaurs used to be either Sheep or Goats, or their lawyers. They didn’t notice the change in the legal environment until too late, if at all, and so are either trying to carry on as if nothing had changed, with disasterous consequences, or have given up any significant use of the court system, and try to deal with things in other ways.  The lawyers have gone out of business.

How to be a lawyer for Goats

In the new world there are many new rules:

  • Be light on your feet – be ready to adapt to changes quickly. Just because you always did something one way doesn’t mean that it’s the best way now.
  • Keep up to date – there are frequent  changes in the law and the CPR and in the court decisions that follow them. You have to be ahead of the crowd to win.
  • Winning matters – this is why your clients come to you.
  • Keep an open mind – there are lots of different was of doing things. If one way doesn’t work there are many others.
  • Payment by the hour is on the way out. Clients much prefer payment by stages (eg up to issue) or by results. You have to adapt.
  • You’ve got to know the shortcuts. Nobody wants to go all the way to trial. Know how to get summary judgment or default judgment, or the Defence struck out. Or more usually, a good offer.
  • Specialise. You can’t know everything well enought to be really good at it. And being really good matters.
  • Get it right first time. You can’t afford to do things twice.
  • Don’t carry passengers. You need a few experts plus a flexible team to draw on when you need them.
  • Be small. You may grow into a Sheep with guaranteed multiple repeat businesses. But until then you can’t afford to be bigger than you have to be.
  • Make friends. This is the key to being a small business. There are lots of people out there who want to help you and you only need to pay them when you need them. And sometimes not even then. A smile may be worth hundreds.
  • And remember you’re a lawyer. You don’t run the client’s business or life. That’s their concern. But you’re liable to lots of extra obligations as a lawyer. And being one will pay the rent next year, when this client has moved on.

I’m not telling you everything. I need to make a living too. As I said, I’m a practical lawyer. But this is the new reality. And if you ignore it you are likely to go the same way as the dinosaurs. Which is not a good idea, on the whole.

A Happy New Year to you all.

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Author: Coventry Man

A perspective from a litigation lawyer in the Midlands. After many years in Coventry I am now with David Lee Solicitors in Kenilworth, helping people with all sorts of litigation, especially property and landlord & tenant problems.

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